An Asian origin for a 10,000-year-old domesticated plant in the Americas.

@article{Erickson2005AnAO,
  title={An Asian origin for a 10,000-year-old domesticated plant in the Americas.},
  author={David L. Erickson and Bruce D. Smith and Andrew C. Clarke and Daniel H. Sandweiss and Noreen Tuross},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2005},
  volume={102 51},
  pages={
          18315-20
        }
}
New genetic and archaeological approaches have substantially improved our understanding of the transition to agriculture, a major turning point in human history that began 10,000-5,000 years ago with the independent domestication of plants and animals in eight world regions. In the Americas, however, understanding the initial domestication of New World species has long been complicated by the early presence of an African enigma, the bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria). Indigenous to Africa, it… 

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