An Appalachian population of neochoristoderes (Diapsida, Choristodera) elucidated using fossil evidence and ecological niche modelling

@article{Dudgeon2021AnAP,
  title={An Appalachian population of neochoristoderes (Diapsida, Choristodera) elucidated using fossil evidence and ecological niche modelling},
  author={Thomas W. Dudgeon and Zoe Landry and Wayne R. Callahan and Carl Mehling and Steven Ballwanz},
  journal={Palaeontology},
  year={2021},
  volume={64}
}
Four neochoristoderan vertebral centra are described from the latest Cretaceous of New Jersey, USA. One specimen was recovered from the basal transgressive lag of the Navesink Formation in the area of Holmdel, New Jersey, and two others were recovered nearby and probably were derived from the same horizon. The fourth was recovered from the Marshalltown sequence in the vicinity of the Ellisdale Dinosaur Site. These vertebrae expand the geographical range of Late Cretaceous neochoristoderes in… 

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