An ‘other-Race Effect’ for Categorizing Faces by Sex

@article{OToole1996AnE,
  title={An ‘other-Race Effect’ for Categorizing Faces by Sex},
  author={Alice J. O'Toole and Jason Peterson and Kenneth A. Deffenbacher},
  journal={Perception},
  year={1996},
  volume={25},
  pages={669 - 676}
}
It is well-known that people recognize faces of their own race more accurately than faces of other races—a phenomenon often referred to as the ‘other-race effect’. Using brief presentations of faces, we show a similar effect for the task of discriminating the sex of a face. Specifically, Caucasian observers discriminated male and female Caucasian faces more accurately/efficiently than did Oriental(1) observers, and Oriental observers discriminated male and female Japanese faces more accurately… Expand

Figures and Topics from this paper

Own- and other-race categorization of faces by race, gender, and age
TLDR
Data suggest that determining the race of a face is not imposed as a first step in face processing, preempting the perception of other category-defining physiognomic characteristics. Expand
An ‘Other-Race’ Effect in Age Estimation from Faces
TLDR
The main result of this experiment was a significant ‘race of subject’ x ‘ race of face’ inter-action showing that Caucasian participants performed better at evaluating Caucasian faces than African faces, however, African participants performed equally with both type of faces. Expand
Perceptual experience shapes our ability to categorize faces by national origin: A new other‐race effect
TLDR
A new other-race effect in sensitivity to national origin of faces that is linked to perceptual expertise is demonstrated, but only if participants have greater perceptual experience with own-race, than other- race faces. Expand
Sex Categorization of Faces: The Effects of Age and Experience
TLDR
Results indicated that all ages easily classify the sex of adult faces, and sex categorization is more challenging for child than for adult faces due to their reduced sexual dimorphic facial characteristics. Expand
Infant preference for female faces occurs for same- but not other-race faces.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that by 3 months of age, infants will respond preferentially to same-race faces and faces depicting the gender of the primary caregiver, and emergence of the female face preference for same- versus other- race faces is investigated. Expand
Is Facial Skin Tone Sufficient to Produce a Cross-Racial Identification Effect?
TLDR
It is shown that neither morphological variation nor differential confidence is necessary for a cross-racial identification effect, and research clearly supports the existence of an other-race effect for human faces whereby own-race faces are more accurately perceived and recognized. Expand
The Other-Race and Other-Species Effect during a Sex Categorization Task: An Eye Tracker Study
TLDR
Eye tracking data suggests that the gaze of participants shifts from the eye to the nose region with decreased racial and species-based familiarity, and this could affect both participants’ behavioral performance and gaze behavior during sex categorization. Expand
Facial race and sex cues have a comparable influence on emotion recognition in Chinese and Australian participants
TLDR
Results suggest similarity in the influence of social category cues on emotion categorisation in the Australian and Chinese samples. Expand
Measuring sexual dimorphism with a race-gender face space.
TLDR
An example of a correlation that arises from differences in the degree of sexual dimorphism is presented, and stimuli that are decorrelated in terms of race and gender are created. Expand
An Examination of the Own-Race Preference in Infancy
The goal of this dissertation was to better characterize the nature of infants’ visual preference for own-race faces, and to test two theories regarding its origin. Chapters I and II assessed whetherExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 32 REFERENCES
A perspective on the recognition of other-race faces
The purpose of the present study is to provide a perspective on the recognition of other-race faces, i.e., black faces by white subjects. Past research has indicated that individuals have greaterExpand
Do “They all look alike?” The Effect of Race, Sex, Experience, and Attitudes on the Ability to Recognize Faces1
Legal scholars and social scientists have long assumed that there is a racial bias in facial recognition and eyewitness identifications, with persons being much more accurate in identifying personsExpand
Structural aspects of face recognition and the other-race effect
TLDR
The human data and simulation results indicate that the memorahility component of typicality may be related to small, local, distinctive features, whereas the attractiveness/familiarity component may be more related to the global, shape-based properties of the face. Expand
Development of differential recognition for own- and other-race faces.
TLDR
Although the youngest children recognized both kinds of faces equally well, recognition accuracy for Caucasian faces was superior to that for Oriental faces among older subjects, and females at college level were clearly superior to males at recognizing faces. Expand
Sex, race, age, and beauty as factors in recognition of faces
Three hundred Ss, black and white, male and female, at four age levels were tested for their recognition of 12 photographed faces: black, white, male, female, child, adolescent, and adult. FemalesExpand
Understanding face recognition.
TLDR
A functional model is proposed in which structural encoding processes provide descriptions suitable for the analysis of facial speech, for analysis of expression and for face recognition units, and it is proposed that the cognitive system plays an active role in deciding whether or not the initial match is sufficiently close to indicate true recognition. Expand
Children's ability to recognize other children's faces.
TLDR
Children from an integrated school show smaller differences recognizing black or white faces than children from segregated schools, but the effect appears only for children of the integrated school who also live in mixed-race neighborhoods. Expand
Organization and functions of cells responsive to faces in the temporal cortex.
TLDR
The selectivity for view suggests that the neural operations underlying face or head recognition rely on parallel analyses of different characteristic views of the head, the outputs of these view-specific analyses being subsequently combined to support view-independent (object-centred) recognition. Expand
Cross-language speech perception: Evidence for perceptual reorganization during the first year of life
Previous work in which we compared English infants, English adults, and Hindi adults on their ability to discriminate two pairs of Hindi (non-English) speech contrasts has indicated that infantsExpand
Relations between the statistics of natural images and the response properties of cortical cells.
  • D. Field
  • Computer Science, Medicine
  • Journal of the Optical Society of America. A, Optics and image science
  • 1987
TLDR
The results obtained with six natural images suggest that the orientation and the spatial-frequency tuning of mammalian simple cells are well suited for coding the information in such images if the goal of the code is to convert higher-order redundancy into first- order redundancy. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...