An ‘I see you’ prey–predator signal between the Asian honeybee, Apis cerana, and the hornet, Vespa velutina

@article{Tan2012AnS,
  title={An ‘I see you’ prey–predator signal between the Asian honeybee, Apis cerana, and the hornet, Vespa velutina
},
  author={K. Tan and Zhenwei Wang and Hua Li and S. Yang and Zongwenu Hu and G. Kastberger and B. Oldroyd},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2012},
  volume={83},
  pages={879-882}
}
When a prey animal displays to a predator, the prey benefits because it is less likely to be attacked, and the predator benefits because it can break off an attack that is unlikely to succeed because the prey has been alerted. We argue that an ‘I see you’ signal has coevolved between the Asian hive bee, Apis cerana, and its hornet predator, Vespa velutina. When a hornet approaches a bee colony, guards perform a shaking movement that repels the hornet. To test whether this is an ‘I see you… Expand

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