Análisis de la influencia del grado de hidratación de la epidermis en el comportamiento biomecánico de la piel in vivo

@inproceedings{Rodrigues2004AnlisisDL,
  title={An{\'a}lisis de la influencia del grado de hidrataci{\'o}n de la epidermis en el comportamiento biomec{\'a}nico de la piel in vivo},
  author={Luciana Miranda Rodrigues and Pilar Cort{\'e}s Pinto},
  year={2004}
}
The Bio-mechanical properties of in vivo human skin are important indicators of a healthy skin condition, with regardto functional organisation. It seems that these properties do not only arise from the cutaneous structures themselves, butalso from the contribution of underlying tissues. Consequently, in the study of its behaviour a purely biomechanicalapproach cannot be taken. Furthermore, the technological systems used the in vivo assessment of these properties,cannot provide a direct… 

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