Amygdalar interhemispheric functional connectivity differs between the non-depressed and depressed human brain.

@article{Irwin2004AmygdalarIF,
  title={Amygdalar interhemispheric functional connectivity differs between the non-depressed and depressed human brain.},
  author={William J. Irwin and Michael J. Anderle and Heather C. Abercrombie and Stacey M. Schaefer and Ned H. Kalin and Richard J. Davidson},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2004},
  volume={21 2},
  pages={674-86}
}
The amygdalae are important, if not critical, brain regions for many affective, attentional and memorial processes, and dysfunction of the amygdalae has been a consistent finding in the study of clinical depression. Theoretical models of the functional neuroanatomy of both normal and psychopathological affective processes which posit cortical hemispheric specialization of functions have been supported by both lesion and functional neuroimaging studies in humans. Results from human neuroimaging… CONTINUE READING