Amygdala responsiveness to emotional words is modulated by subclinical anxiety and depression.

@article{Laeger2012AmygdalaRT,
  title={Amygdala responsiveness to emotional words is modulated by subclinical anxiety and depression.},
  author={Inga Laeger and Christian Dobel and Udo Dannlowski and Harald Kugel and Dominik Grotegerd and Johanna Kissler and Katharina Keuper and Annuschka Salima Eden and Pienie Zwitserlood and Peter Zwanzger},
  journal={Behavioural brain research},
  year={2012},
  volume={233 2},
  pages={508-16}
}
Several neuroimaging studies underlined the importance of the amygdala and prefrontal brain structures (e.g. dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [DLPFC]) for the processing of emotional stimuli and for emotion regulation. Many studies used visual scenes or faces as emotion-inducing material, and there is evidence that negative or positive words activate emotion-processing brain regions in the same way. However, no study so far focused on the influence of subclinical measures of anxiety or depression… CONTINUE READING