Amphipols and fluorinated surfactants: Two alternatives to detergents for studying membrane proteins in vitro.

Abstract

Handling integral membrane proteins in aqueous solutions traditionally relies on the use of detergents, which are surfactants capable of dispersing the components of biological membranes into mixed micelles. The dissociating character of detergents, however, most often causes solubilized membrane proteins to be unstable. This has prompted the development of alternative, less-aggressive surfactants designed to keep membrane proteins soluble, after they have been solubilized, under milder conditions. A short overview is presented of the structure, properties, and uses of two families of such surfactants: amphiphilic polymers ("amphipols") and fluorinated surfactants.

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-60761-344-2_14
05010015020102011201220132014201520162017
Citations per Year

314 Citations

Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 314 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

Cite this paper

@article{Breyton2010AmphipolsAF, title={Amphipols and fluorinated surfactants: Two alternatives to detergents for studying membrane proteins in vitro.}, author={C{\'e}cile Breyton and Bernard Pucci and J L Popot}, journal={Methods in molecular biology}, year={2010}, volume={601}, pages={219-45} }