Amphibious flies and paedomorphism in the Jurassic period

@article{Huang2013AmphibiousFA,
  title={Amphibious flies and paedomorphism in the Jurassic period},
  author={Diying Huang and Andr{\'e} Nel and Chenyang Cai and Qibin Lin and Michael S. Engel},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2013},
  volume={495},
  pages={94-97}
}
The species of the Strashilidae (strashilids) have been the most perplexing of fossil insects from the Jurassic period of Russia and China. They have been widely considered to be ectoparasites of pterosaurs or feathered dinosaurs, based on the putative presence of piercing and sucking mouthparts and hind tibio-basitarsal pincers purportedly used to fix onto the host’s hairs or feathers. Both the supposed host and parasite occur in the Daohugou beds from the Middle Jurassic epoch of China… 

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