Amphibian declines and climate disturbance: the case of the golden toad and the harlequin frog

@article{Pounds1994AmphibianDA,
  title={Amphibian declines and climate disturbance: the case of the golden toad and the harlequin frog},
  author={J. Alan Pounds and Martha L. Crump},
  journal={Conservation Biology},
  year={1994},
  volume={8},
  pages={72-85}
}
The endemic golden toad (Bufo periglenes) was abundant in Costa Rica’s Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve in April–May 1987 but afterwards disappeared, along with local populations of the harlequin frog (Atelopus varius. [] Key Method For our analyses of local weather patterns, we define a 12-month (July–June) amphibian moisture-temperature cycle consisting of four periods: (1) late wet season; (2) transition into dry season; (3) dry season; and (4) post-dry-season (early-wet-season) recovery. The 1986–1987…

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