Amphibian Decline or Extinction? Current Declines Dwarf Background Extinction Rate

@inproceedings{Mccallum2007AmphibianDO,
  title={Amphibian Decline or Extinction? Current Declines Dwarf Background Extinction Rate},
  author={M. Mccallum},
  year={2007}
}
  • M. Mccallum
  • Published 1 September 2007
  • Environmental Science, Geography
Abstract Amphibian declines and extinctions are critical concerns of biologists around the world. The estimated current rate of amphibian extinction is known, but how it compares to the background amphibian extinction rate from the fossil record has not been well studied. I compared current amphibian extinction rates with their reported background extinction rates using standard and fuzzy arithmetic. These calculations suggest that the current extinction rate of amphibians could be 211 times… 
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