Amphibian Chemical Defense: Antifungal Metabolites of the Microsymbiont Janthinobacterium lividum on the Salamander Plethodon cinereus

@article{Brucker2008AmphibianCD,
  title={Amphibian Chemical Defense: Antifungal Metabolites of the Microsymbiont Janthinobacterium lividum on the Salamander Plethodon cinereus},
  author={Robert M. Brucker and Reid N Harris and Christian Schwantes and T. N. Gallaher and Devon C. Flaherty and Brianna Ashlyn Lam and Kevin P. C. Minbiole},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2008},
  volume={34},
  pages={1422-1429}
}
Disease has spurred declines in global amphibian populations. In particular, the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has decimated amphibian diversity in some areas unaffected by habitat loss. However, there is little evidence to explain how some amphibian species persist despite infection or even clear the pathogen beyond detection. One hypothesis is that certain bacterial symbionts on the skin of amphibians inhibit the growth of the pathogen. An antifungal strain of… 

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