Among 46 near full length HIV type 1 genome sequences from Rakai District, Uganda, subtype D and AD recombinants predominate.

@article{Harris2002Among4N,
  title={Among 46 near full length HIV type 1 genome sequences from Rakai District, Uganda, subtype D and AD recombinants predominate.},
  author={Matthew E. Harris and David Serwadda and Nelson K. Sewankambo and Bohye Kim and Godfrey Kigozi and Noah Kiwanuka and James B Phillips and Fred Wabwire and Mary Meehen and Tom Lutalo and James R Lane and Randall K. Merling and Ronald H Gray and Maria J Wawer and Deborah L. Birx and Merlin L. Robb and Francine E. McCutchan},
  journal={AIDS research and human retroviruses},
  year={2002},
  volume={18 17},
  pages={
          1281-90
        }
}
The impact of HIV-1 genetic diversity on candidate vaccines is uncertain. To minimize genetic diversity in the evaluation of HIV-1 vaccines, vaccine products must be matched to the predominant subtype in a vaccine cohort. To that end, full genome sequencing was used to detect and characterize HIV-1 subtypes and recombinant strains from individuals in Rakai District, Uganda. DNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBC) was PCR amplified using primers in the long terminal repeats… 

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