Amniotic fluid stem cells improve survival and enhance repair of damaged intestine in necrotising enterocolitis via a COX-2 dependent mechanism

@article{Zani2013AmnioticFS,
  title={Amniotic fluid stem cells improve survival and enhance repair of damaged intestine in necrotising enterocolitis via a COX-2 dependent mechanism},
  author={Augusto Zani and Mara Cananzi and Francesco Fascetti-Leon and Giuseppe Lauriti and Virpi V. Smith and Sveva Bollini and Marco Ghionzoli and Antonello D’Arrigo and Michela Pozzobon and Martina Piccoli and Amy N. Hicks and Jack A. Wells and Bernard M Siow and Neil James Sebire and Colin E. Bishop and Alberta Leon and Anthony J. Atala and Mark F. Lythgoe and Agostino Pierro and Simon Eaton and Paolo de Coppi},
  journal={Gut},
  year={2013},
  volume={63},
  pages={300 - 309}
}
Objective Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) remains one of the primary causes of morbidity and mortality in neonates and alternative strategies are needed. Stem cells have become a therapeutic option for other intestinal diseases, which share some features with NEC. We tested the hypothesis that amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells exerted a beneficial effect in a neonatal rat model of NEC. Design Rats intraperitoneally injected with AFS cells and their controls (bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells… 
Human placental-derived stem cell therapy ameliorates experimental necrotizing enterocolitis and supports restoration of the intestinal stem cell niche
TLDR
HPSC are a novel research tool that can now be utilized to elucidate critical neonatal repair mechanisms to overcome NEC disease and demonstrate hPSC can promote epithelial healing of NEC intestinal damage in part through support of the intestinal stem cell niche.
Activation of Wnt signaling by amniotic fluid stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles attenuates intestinal injury in experimental necrotizing enterocolitis
TLDR
It is demonstrated that AFSC and EV attenuate NEC intestinal injury by activating the Wnt signaling pathway, and AFSC-derived EV administration is thus a potential emergent novel treatment strategy for NEC.
Evaluating the efficacy of different types of stem cells in preserving gut barrier function in necrotizing enterocolitis.
TLDR
Although all four types of SC reduce permeability equivalently, SC derived from amniotic fluid may be preferable due to availability at delivery and ease of culture, potentially enhancing clinical translation.
Amniotic fluid stem cell administration can prevent epithelial injury from necrotizing enterocolitis
TLDR
AFSCs are unique in transiently enhancing healthy intestinal epithelial cell growth, which offers protection against the development of experimental NEC, and can potentially be used as a preventative strategy for neonates at risk of NEC, while MSCs cannot be used.
Stem cells and necrotizing enterocolitis: A direct comparison of the efficacy of multiple types of stem cells.
TLDR
All four SC groups reduced the incidence and severity of experimental NEC equivalently and AF-MSC may be preferable because of availability of AF at delivery and ease of expansion, increasing potential for clinical translation.
Treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis by conditioned medium derived from human amniotic fluid stem cells
TLDR
CM derived from human AFSC administered in experimental NEC exhibited various benefits including reduced intestinal injury and inflammation, increased enterocyte proliferation, and restored intestinal stem cell activity.
Stem cells as a potential therapy for necrotizing enterocolitis
TLDR
The current data are promising and demonstrate that stem cells do have an effect in rodent models of NEC, and open up novel areas of research into a prevention or therapy for this devastating disease.
Liver damage, proliferation, and progenitor cell markers in experimental necrotizing enterocolitis.
TLDR
Modulation of progenitor cell expressing LGR5 may result in stimulation of liver regeneration in NEC-induced liver injury and improved clinical outcome.
Administration of extracellular vesicles derived from human amniotic fluid stem cells: a new treatment for necrotizing enterocolitis
Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating gastrointestinal disease. Amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC) improve NEC injury but human translation remains difficult. We aimed to evaluate the use of
Stem Cells as Therapy for Necrotizing Enterocolitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Preclinical Studies
TLDR
The data from this meta-analysis suggest that both stem cells and stem cell-derived exosomes prevented NEC in rodent experimental models, and poor reporting standards are common and hamper the reliable interpretation of preclinical evidence for stem cell therapy for NEC.
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