Ammonium in nervous tissue: transport across cell membranes, fluxes from neurons to glial cells, and role in signalling.

@article{Marcaggi2001AmmoniumIN,
  title={Ammonium in nervous tissue: transport across cell membranes, fluxes from neurons to glial cells, and role in signalling.},
  author={Pa{\"i}kan Marcaggi and Jackie A. Coles},
  journal={Progress in neurobiology},
  year={2001},
  volume={64 2},
  pages={157-83}
}
Most, but not all, animal cell membranes are permeable to NH3, the neutral, minority form of ammonium which is in equilibrium with the charged majority form NH4+. NH4+ crosses many cell membranes via ion channels or on membrane transporters, and cultured mammalian astrocytes and glial cells of bee retina take up NH4+ avidly, in the latter case on a Cl(-)-cotransporter selective for NH4+ over K+. In bee retina, a flux of ammonium from neurons to glial cells is an essential component of energy… CONTINUE READING