Ammoniated phyllosilicates with a likely outer Solar System origin on (1) Ceres

@article{Sanctis2015AmmoniatedPW,
  title={Ammoniated phyllosilicates with a likely outer Solar System origin on (1) Ceres},
  author={Maria Cristina De Sanctis and Eleonora Ammannito and A. Raponi and Simone Marchi and Thomas B. McCord and Harry Y. McSween and Fabrizio Capaccioni and Maria Teresa Capria and Filippo Giacomo Carrozzo and Mauro Ciarniello and Andrea Longobardo and Francesca Tosi and Sergio Fonte and Michelangelo Formisano and Alessandro Frigeri and Marco Giardino and Gianfranco Magni and Ernesto Palomba and Diego Turrini and Francesca Zambon and J.-Ph. Combe and William Charles Feldman and Ralf Jaumann and Lucy A. McFadden and Carle M. Pieters and Thomas H. Prettyman and M. J. Toplis and Carol A. Raymond and Christopher T. Russell},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2015},
  volume={528},
  pages={241-244}
}
Studies of the dwarf planet (1) Ceres using ground-based and orbiting telescopes have concluded that its closest meteoritic analogues are the volatile-rich CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. Water in clay minerals, ammoniated phyllosilicates, or a mixture of Mg(OH)2 (brucite), Mg2CO3 and iron-rich serpentine have all been proposed to exist on the surface. In particular, brucite has been suggested from analysis of the mid-infrared spectrum of Ceres. But the lack of spectral data across telluric… 
Origin of ammoniated phyllosilicates on dwarf planet Ceres and asteroids
TLDR
The present experimental investigations corroborate the possibility that Ceres formed at a location where ammonia ices on the surface would have been stable and reveal the thermal and radiation stability of ammoniated-phyllosilicates over a timescale of at least some 500 million years.
Distribution of phyllosilicates on the surface of Ceres
TLDR
The widespread presence of these two types of minerals is a strong indication of a global and extensive aqueous alteration—i.e., the presence of water at some point in Ceres’ geological history.
Detection of local H2O exposed at the surface of Ceres
TLDR
Dawn VIR infrared observations of Oxo crater on Ceres demonstrate the detection of H2O at the surface, and theories predict a water ice-rich mantle, and water vapor emissions have been observed, yet no water (H2O) has been observed.
DIFFERENT ORIGINS OR DIFFERENT EVOLUTIONS? DECODING THE SPECTRAL DIVERSITY AMONG C-TYPE ASTEROIDS
Anhydrous pyroxene-rich interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have been proposed as surface analogs for about two-thirds of all C-complex asteroids. However, this suggestion appears to beinconsistent
Carbonaceous chondrites as analogs for the composition and alteration of Ceres
The mineralogy and geochemistry of Ceres, as constrained by Dawn's instruments, are broadly consistent with a carbonaceous chondrite (CM/CI) bulk composition. Differences explainable by Ceres’s more
Oxo Crater on (1) Ceres: Geological History and the Role of Water-ice
Dwarf planet Ceres (empty set similar to 940 km) is the largest object in the main asteroid belt. Investigations suggest that Ceres is a thermally evolved, volatile-rich body with potential
Mineralogy of Occator crater on Ceres and insight into its evolution from the properties of carbonates, phyllosilicates, and chlorides
Abstract Occator Crater on dwarf planet Ceres hosts the so-called faculae, several areas with material 5 to 10 times the albedo of the average Ceres surface: Cerealia Facula, the brightest and
Cryovolcanism on Ceres
TLDR
It is proposed that hydrated salts with low eutectic temperatures and low thermal conductivities enabled the presence of cryomagmatic liquids within Ceres, a key process for Ceres’ evolution as recorded by the aqueously altered, secondary minerals observed on the surface.
Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres
TLDR
It is concluded that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the ‘snow line’, which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense, and is consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material.
An aqueously altered carbon-rich Ceres
The surface mineralogy of dwarf planet Ceres appears to be dominated by products of rock–fluid interactions, such as phyllosilicates—some of which are NH4-bearing—and carbonates1–3. Elemental
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 44 REFERENCES
Brucite and carbonate assemblages from altered olivine-rich materials on Ceres
The mineralogy of the dwarf planet Ceres has long remained uncertain. The infrared spectral features of this planetary body are indicative of minerals derived from the aqueous alteration of
AMMONIA IN THE EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM: AN ACCOUNT FROM CARBONACEOUS METEORITES
This study presents a survey of abundance distribution and isotopic composition of the ammonia found incorporated in the kerogen-like insoluble material of selected carbonaceous chondrite meteorites;
Sublimation in bright spots on (1) Ceres
TLDR
It is concluded that Ceres must have accreted material from beyond the ‘snow line’, which is the distance from the Sun at which water molecules condense, and is consistent with hydrated magnesium sulfates mixed with dark background material.
Localized sources of water vapour on the dwarf planet (1) Ceres
TLDR
The detection of water vapour around Ceres is reported, with at least 1026 molecules being produced per second, originating from localized sources that seem to be linked to mid-latitude regions on the surface.
Nature and degree of aqueous alteration in CM and CI carbonaceous chondrites
We investigated the petrologic, geochemical, and spectral parameters that relate to the type and degree of aqueous alteration in nine CM chondrites and one CI (Ivuna) carbonaceous chondrite. Our
Classification of hydrous meteorites (CR, CM and C2 ungrouped) by phyllosilicate fraction: PSD-XRD modal mineralogy and planetesimal environments
The relative differences in the degree of hydration should be reflected in any classification scheme for aqueously altered meteorites. Here we report the bulk mineralogies and degree of hydration in
UV-Vis-NIR absorption features of heated phyllosilicates as remote-sensing clues of thermal histories of primitive asteroids
Powder samples of five kinds of phyllosilicates (antigorite, lizardite, clinochrysotile, chlorite, and saponite) have been heated in vacuum at 200, 300, 400, 500, and 600 ° C, and their UV-Vis-NIR
Evidence for Ammonium-Bearing Minerals on Ceres
Spectra obtained from recent telescopic observation of 1-Ceres and laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations of three component mixtures of Ceres analog material suggest that an ammoniated
Coordinated spectral and XRD analyses of magnesite‐nontronite‐forsterite mixtures and implications for carbonates on Mars
[1] Mineral detection on Mars largely relies on laboratory data of minerals and mineral mixtures. The objective of this study is to provide reflectance spectra in the visible/near-infrared (VNIR) and
Low-temperature reflectance spectra of brucite and the primitive surface of 1-Ceres?
Abstract The surface of Ceres, the most massive asteroid, presents a peculiar absorption band at 3.06 μm. This feature has been attributed to a number of candidate phases, including a magnesium
...
1
2
3
4
5
...