Ammonia oxidation on Ir(1 1 1): Why Ir is more selective to N2 than Pt

@inproceedings{Weststrate2010AmmoniaOO,
  title={Ammonia oxidation on Ir(1 1 1): Why Ir is more selective to N2 than Pt},
  author={Cornelis Johannes Weststrate and J. W. Bakker and Andreaa C. Gluhoi and Wiebke Ludwig and Ben E. Nieuwenhuys},
  year={2010}
}
Abstract NH3 does not dissociate on a clean Ir(1 1 1) surface, but dissociation can be induced by radiation, which yields all possible NHxad species. NHad is the most stable and it is the only intermediate found at room temperature. NHad decomposes between 350 and 500 K, yielding NH3 (g) and Nad, which desorbs as N2 between 550 and 700 K. Adsorbed oxygen atoms induce NH3 dissociation between 300 and 400 K, forming NHad and H2O. NHad decomposes further between 350 and 450 K, forming Nad and H2O… CONTINUE READING