Amino‐Acid Properties and Consequences of Substitutions

@inproceedings{Betts2003AminoAcidPA,
  title={Amino‐Acid Properties and Consequences of Substitutions},
  author={Matthew J. Betts and Robert B. Russell},
  year={2003}
}
Since the earliest protein sequences and structures were determined, it has been clear that the positioning and properties of amino acids are key to understanding many biological processes (Pal et al., 2006). For example, the first-determined protein structure, haemoglobin, provided a molecular explanation for the genetic disease sickle cell anaemia. A single nucleotide mutation leads to a substitution of glutamate in normal individuals with valine in those who suffer the disease. The… Expand
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