American Journal of Gastroenterology Lecture: Intestinal Microbiota and the Role of Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) in Treatment of C. difficile Infection

@article{Brandt2013AmericanJO,
  title={American Journal of Gastroenterology Lecture: Intestinal Microbiota and the Role of Fecal Microbiota Transplant (FMT) in Treatment of C. difficile Infection},
  author={Lawrence J Brandt},
  journal={The American Journal of Gastroenterology},
  year={2013},
  volume={108},
  pages={177-185}
}
  • L. Brandt
  • Published 1 February 2013
  • Medicine
  • The American Journal of Gastroenterology
The vital roles that intestinal flora, now called microbiota, have in maintaining our health are being increasingly appreciated. Starting with birth, exposure to the outside world begins the life-long intimate association our microbiota will have with our diet and environment, and initiates determination of the post-natal structural and functional maturation of the gut. Moreover, vital interactions of the microbiota with our metabolic activities, as well as with the immunological apparatus that… 
Fecal Microbiota Transplantation: A Review of Emerging Indications Beyond Relapsing Clostridium difficile Toxin Colitis.
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Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), a unique method to reestablish a sustained balance in the disrupted microbiota of diseased intestine, has demonstrated great success in the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection and has gained increasing acceptance in clinical use.
[Recommendations for the use of faecal microbiota transplantation "stool transplantation": consensus of the Austrian Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (ÖGGH) in cooperation with the Austrian Society of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine].
TLDR
This consensus report of the Austrian society of gastroenterology and hepatology (ÖGGH) in cooperation with the Austrian societies of infectious diseases and tropical medicine provides instructions for physicians who want to use FMT which are based on the current medical literature.
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Over the past several years, FMT has been reported to be highly effective in treating patients with RCDI, and has the enormous potential for the use of FMT as a treatment for a myriad of other diseases includes inflammatory bowel disease and insulin resistance/metabolic syndrome.
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TLDR
The aim of this review is to provide health-care professionals with a concise summary of management options for CDI, with special focus on FMT and its indications, contraindications, and implementation experiences.
Faecal microbiota transplantation
TLDR
Faecal microbiota transplantation has been found to be superior to antibiotics for antibioticassociated recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) and a number of randomized clinical trials with FMT are currently under way, focusing on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), diabetes mellitus (DM) and non-alcoholic steatosis hepatitis.
Fecal microbiota transplantation for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection.
TLDR
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who undergo FMT for CDI may be at increased risk of IBD flare, and caution should be exercised with use of FMT in that population, and rigorously conducted prospective studies are needed.
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  • Medicine
    The American Journal of Gastroenterology
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