American College of Chest Physicians consensus statement on the management of dyspnea in patients with advanced lung or heart disease.

@article{Mahler2010AmericanCO,
  title={American College of Chest Physicians consensus statement on the management of dyspnea in patients with advanced lung or heart disease.},
  author={Donald A Mahler and Paul A. Selecky and Christopher G. Harrod and Joshua O. Benditt and Virginia Carrieri-Kohlman and J. Randall Curtis and Harold L. Manning and Richard A. Mularski and Basil Varkey and Margaret L. Campbell and Edward R. Carter and Jun R. Chiong and Eugene Wesley Ely and John Hansen-Flaschen and Denis E. O’Donnell and Alexander Waller},
  journal={Chest},
  year={2010},
  volume={137 3},
  pages={
          674-91
        }
}
BACKGROUND This consensus statement was developed based on the understanding that patients with advanced lung or heart disease are not being treated consistently and effectively for relief of dyspnea. METHODS A panel of experts was convened. After a literature review, the panel developed 23 statements covering five domains that were considered relevant to the topic condition. Endorsement of these statements was assessed by levels of agreement or disagreement on a five-point Likert scale using… 

Tables from this paper

Management of dyspnea in patients with advanced lung or heart disease: practical guidance from the American college of chest physicians consensus statement.

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An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: assessment and palliative management of dyspnea crisis.

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Opioid therapy for refractory dyspnea in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: patients' experiences and outcomes.

Opioids were a helpful and acceptable intervention for refractory dyspnea in patients with advanced COPD, and many of the patients experienced sustained benefits over months, which supports recent recommendations to consider opioids in this setting.

Perspectives of patients, family caregivers and physicians about the use of opioids for refractory dyspnea in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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