America's Long Eulogy for Compromise: Henry Clay and American Politics, 1854-58

@article{Paulus2014AmericasLE,
  title={America's Long Eulogy for Compromise: Henry Clay and American Politics, 1854-58},
  author={Sarah Bischoff Paulus},
  journal={The Journal of the Civil War Era},
  year={2014},
  volume={4},
  pages={28 - 52}
}
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