Ambulatory dispersal behavior ofNeoseiulus fallacis (Acarina: Phytoseiidae) in relation to prey density and temperature

@article{Berry2005AmbulatoryDB,
  title={Ambulatory dispersal behavior ofNeoseiulus fallacis (Acarina: Phytoseiidae) in relation to prey density and temperature},
  author={James S. Berry and Thomas O. Holtzer},
  journal={Experimental \& Applied Acarology},
  year={2005},
  volume={8},
  pages={253-274}
}
Ambulatory dispersal behavior ofNeoseiulus fallacis (Garman) was studied in the laboratory to evaluate within-plant movement in relation to temperature and prey density. Adult femaleN. fallacis were confined in 2.5-cm-diameter arenas on the abaxial surface of excised corn leaves. Four temperatures (23, 28, 33, and 39° C) and prey densities ranging from 0 to 55 spider mite eggs per cm2 were used. The walking paths of these mites were traced, digitized and used to calculate turning angles… 
Survival and plant-prey finding by Neoseiulus fallacis Neoseiulus fallacis (Acari: Phytoseiidae) on soil substrates after aerial dispersal
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
The rate of take-off for passive dispersal by N. baraki increased with food deprivation and exposure to the residues of agricultural acaricides, particularly the biopesticide azadirachtin, although abamectin and fenpyroximate also stimulated dispersal.
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TLDR
The predatory mite Neoseiulus cucumeris is used for biological control of phytophagous mites and thrips on greenhouse cucumber and sweet pepper, but apparently neither temperature and humidity varied from the top to the lower level of the plants, apparently neither these factors nor the presence of pollen outside the flowers influenced mite distribution.
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TLDR
Starvation and to a lesser extent temperature affected display of the dispersal behavior of the ovipositing adult females and, to a limited extent, the adult males and the preoviposite adult females.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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