Ambulatory Care: Efficacy and Safety of Oral Phenylephrine: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

@article{Hatton2007AmbulatoryCE,
  title={Ambulatory Care: Efficacy and Safety of Oral Phenylephrine: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis},
  author={Randy C. Hatton and Almut G. Winterstein and Russell P McKelvey and Jonathan J Shuster and Leslie Hendeles},
  journal={Annals of Pharmacotherapy},
  year={2007},
  volume={41},
  pages={381 - 390}
}
Background: Oral phenylephrine is used as a decongestant, yet there has been no previously published systematic review supporting its efficacy and safety. Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of oral phenylephrine as a nonprescription decongestant. Methods: MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, EMBASE International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and the Federal Register were searched for-English and non–English-language studies published through January 2007 that… Expand
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During a 6-hour observation period, a single dose of pseudoephedrine but not Phenylephrine resulted in significant improvement in measures of nasal congestion, and neither phenylephrine nor pseudoeposedrine had an effect on nonnasal symptoms. Expand
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