Alzheimer's disease-affected brain: Presence of oligomeric Aβ ligands (ADDLs) suggests a molecular basis for reversible memory loss

@article{Gong2003AlzheimersDB,
  title={Alzheimer's disease-affected brain: Presence of oligomeric A$\beta$ ligands (ADDLs) suggests a molecular basis for reversible memory loss},
  author={Yuesong Gong and Lei Chang and Kirsten L. Viola and Pascale N. Lacor and Mary P. Lambert and Caleb E. Finch and Grant A. Krafft and William L Klein},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2003},
  volume={100},
  pages={10417 - 10422}
}
  • Yuesong Gong, Lei Chang, W. Klein
  • Published 18 August 2003
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
A molecular basis for memory failure in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been recently hypothesized, in which a significant role is attributed to small, soluble oligomers of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Aβ oligomeric ligands (also known as ADDLs) are known to be potent inhibitors of hippocampal long-term potentiation, which is a paradigm for synaptic plasticity, and have been linked to synapse loss and reversible memory failure in transgenic mouse AD models. If such oligomers were to build up in human… 

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