Alzheimer's dementia begins as a disease of small blood vessels, damaged by oxidative‐induced inflammation and dysregulated amyloid metabolism: implications for early detection and therapy

@article{Marchesi2011AlzheimersDB,
  title={Alzheimer's dementia begins as a disease of small blood vessels, damaged by oxidative‐induced inflammation and dysregulated amyloid metabolism: implications for early detection and therapy},
  author={Vincent T. Marchesi},
  journal={The FASEB Journal},
  year={2011},
  volume={25},
  pages={13 - 5}
}
  • V. Marchesi
  • Published 1 January 2011
  • Biology
  • The FASEB Journal
There is a widely shared view among Alzheimer's disease (AD) investigators that the amyloid hypothesis best describes the pathogenic cascade that leads, ultimately, to neuronal degeneration and irreversible dementia. The most persuasive evidence comes from studies of damaged brains of patients in the late stages of AD and from animal studies that attempt to mimic the hereditary forms of early‐onset dementia. Despite this impressive body of knowledge, we still lack the means to either arrest or… 

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