• Corpus ID: 7659760

Alternative reproductive tactics in the paper wasp Polistes dominulus with specific focus on the sit-and-wait tactic

@inproceedings{Starks2001AlternativeRT,
  title={Alternative reproductive tactics in the paper wasp Polistes dominulus with specific focus on the sit-and-wait tactic},
  author={Philip T B Starks},
  year={2001}
}
  • P. Starks
  • Published 2001
  • Environmental Science, Biology
Polistes dominulus females that adopt nests are less cooperative and may expend less energy than nest founding wasps. In an enclosure, 14 nests were adopted by individuals previously unassociated with any nest. No preference for enclosure or non-enclosure nests was detected, suggesting that adopters do not preferentially secure nests containing non-descendent kin. Instead, adopters — who were significantly less likely cooperate than nest constructing wasps — maximized direct fitness benefits by… 

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