Alternative Medicine and Common Errors of Reasoning

@article{Beyerstein2001AlternativeMA,
  title={Alternative Medicine and Common Errors of Reasoning},
  author={Barry L. Beyerstein},
  journal={Academic Medicine},
  year={2001},
  volume={76},
  pages={230–237}
}
Why do so many otherwise intelligent patients and therapists pay considerable sums for products and therapies of alternative medicine, even though most of these either are known to be useless or dangerous or have not been subjected to rigorous scientific testing? The author proposes a number of reasons this occurs: (1) Social and cultural reasons (e.g., many citizens' inability to make an informed choice about a health care product; anti-scientific attitudes meshed with New Age mysticism… Expand
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