Alternating antibiotic treatments constrain evolutionary paths to multidrug resistance

@article{Kim2014AlternatingAT,
  title={Alternating antibiotic treatments constrain evolutionary paths to multidrug resistance},
  author={Seungsoo Kim and Tami D. Lieberman and Roy Kishony},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2014},
  volume={111},
  pages={14494 - 14499}
}
Significance Antibiotic resistance is a growing threat, but the pace of drug discovery remains slow. Combination therapy can inhibit the emergence of de novo resistance but is often too toxic for long-term use. Alternating treatments, in which drugs are used sequentially with periodic switching, have been proposed as a substitute, but it remains uncertain when and how they slow the evolution of resistance. Using experimental evolution and whole-genome sequencing, we find that alternating drugs… Expand
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