Altering the Length-Tension Relationship with Eccentric Exercise

@article{Brughelli2007AlteringTL,
  title={Altering the Length-Tension Relationship with Eccentric Exercise},
  author={Matt E Brughelli and John B. Cronin},
  journal={Sports Medicine},
  year={2007},
  volume={37},
  pages={807-826}
}
The effects of eccentric exercise on muscle injury prevention and athletic performance are emerging areas of interest to researchers. Of particular interest are the adaptations that occur after a single bout, or multiple bouts of eccentric exercise. It has been established that after certain types of eccentric exercise, the optimum length of tension development in muscle can be shifted to longer muscle lengths. Altering the length-tension relationship can have a profound influence on human… 
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