Altered gustatory development in Na(+)-restricted rats is not explained by low Na+ levels in mothers' milk.

Abstract

Placing pregnant rats on a sodium-deficient diet (0.03% NaCl) very early in gestation and then weaning the offspring (sodium-restricted rats) to the same diet precludes development of amiloride-sensitive sodium taste transduction pathways in the offspring. However, normal amiloride-sensitive sodium taste responses can be restored by permitting sodium ingestion by sodium-restricted rats. The present study tested the hypothesis that the concentration of sodium in sodium-restricted mothers' milk must be abnormally low in order to preserve altered gustatory function in the offspring. Other milk electrolyte and total protein concentrations were determined as well. Milk sodium was similar between sodium-restricted and control rat mothers at 10-13 and 16-20 days postpartum, as were levels of potassium and chloride. At 10-13 days postpartum, total protein was higher in milk from sodium-restricted mothers. Sodium-restricted mothers' milk calcium concentrations were higher versus controls at 16-20 days postpartum. These results indicate that the lack of gustatory amiloride sensitivity in sodium-restricted rats cannot be attributed to deficient dietary sodium levels during the suckling period.

Cite this paper

@article{Stewart1993AlteredGD, title={Altered gustatory development in Na(+)-restricted rats is not explained by low Na+ levels in mothers' milk.}, author={Rachel E Stewart and H Tong and R. McCarty and David L. Hill}, journal={Physiology & behavior}, year={1993}, volume={53 4}, pages={823-6} }