Alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists in aircrew for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy.

Abstract

Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) affects the majority of men later in life. Other than surgery, finasteride (Proscar) is currently the only pharmacologic option available for U.S. Air Force (USAF) aircrew. This article will evaluate the current literature regarding the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy with FDA approved tamsulosin (Flomax) and alfuzosin (Uroxatrol), third-generation alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists. Current literature supports the fact that some third-generation alpha blockers limit the side effects of hypotension when compared to other alpha blockers as a result of the specificity of subtype binding of the receptors and the sustained release formulation. Alpha blockers are currently used almost universally for the treatment of BPH; however, they are currently not approved for USAF aircrew. This article will review the aeromedical implications of the side effects of alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists (alfuzosin, tamsulosin), which affect aircrew while performing aeronautical duties, and examine whether alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists should be acceptable medications in certain situations depending on airframe and aeronautical duties.

Cite this paper

@article{Matthies2013Alpha1AA, title={Alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists in aircrew for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy.}, author={Andrew K Matthies and Nina J Tachikawa}, journal={Aviation, space, and environmental medicine}, year={2013}, volume={84 1}, pages={54-8} }