Allopatry as a Gordian Knot for Taxonomists: Patterns of DNA Barcode Divergence in Arctic-Alpine Lepidoptera

@article{Mutanen2012AllopatryAA,
  title={Allopatry as a Gordian Knot for Taxonomists: Patterns of DNA Barcode Divergence in Arctic-Alpine Lepidoptera},
  author={Marko Mutanen and Axel Hausmann and Paul D. N. Hebert and Jean-François Landry and Jeremy R. de Waard and Peter Huemer},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2012},
  volume={7}
}
Many cold adapted species occur in both montane settings and in the subarctic. Their disjunct distributions create taxonomic complexity because there is no standardized method to establish whether their allopatric populations represent single or different species. This study employs DNA barcoding to gain new perspectives on the levels and patterns of sequence divergence among populations of 122 arctic-alpine species of Lepidoptera from the Alps, Fennoscandia and North America. It reveals… 

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