Allometric Prediction of Locomotor Performance: An Example from Southeast Asian Flying Lizards

@article{McGuire2003AllometricPO,
  title={Allometric Prediction of Locomotor Performance: An Example from Southeast Asian Flying Lizards},
  author={Jimmy A McGuire},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2003},
  volume={161},
  pages={337 - 349}
}
  • J. McGuire
  • Published 2003
  • Biology, Medicine, Geography
  • The American Naturalist
Allometric scaling analysis is the standard paradigm for studies attempting to unravel the consequences of evolutionary size change (Huxley 1932; Gould 1966; SchmidtNielsen 1984). Although the value of this approach is clear, prediction of the allometry of performance is often hamstrung by the complexity of biological systems. This complexity derives from the heterogeneous interaction of physiological and morphological variables that together determine maximal performance. Despite this… Expand

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