Allocation concealment and blinding: when ignorance is bliss

@article{Forder2005AllocationCA,
  title={Allocation concealment and blinding: when ignorance is bliss},
  author={Peta M Forder and Val Gebski and Anthony C. Keech},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={2005},
  volume={182}
}
NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW. Peta M Forder, BSc, MPH, Statistician; Val J Gebski, BA, MStat, Associate Professor, and Senior Research Fellow; Anthony C Keech, FRACP, MScEpid, Deputy Director. Reprints will not be available from the authors. Correspondence: Associate Professor Anthony C Keech, NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Locked Bag 77, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW 1450. enquiry@ctc.usyd.edu.au The Medical Journal of Australia ISSN: 0025729X… 

Allocation concealment and blinding: when ignorance is bliss

  • H. Hemilä
  • Medicine, Political Science
    The Medical journal of Australia
  • 2005
It seems that even the ancients explored the intrinsic conflict between caring and commerce in medicine. Today, the relevance of this conflict has grown, as commercialism and its culture of creating

Allocation concealment and blinding: when ignorance is bliss

  • V. Berger
  • Medicine, Political Science
    The Medical journal of Australia
  • 2005
It seems that even the ancients explored the intrinsic conflict between caring and commerce in medicine. Today, the relevance of this conflict has grown, as commercialism and its culture of creating

Allocation concealment and blinding: when ignorance is bliss

It seems that even the ancients explored the intrinsic conflict between caring and commerce in medicine. Today, the relevance of this conflict has grown, as commercialism and its culture of creating

Allocation concealment: a methodological review.

It is highlighted that research needs to be reported to a higher standard and there are many trials reporting poor methods of allocation concealment within the small sample of trials included in this review.

Exploring engagement with authors of randomised controlled trials to develop recommendations to improve allocation concealment implementation and reporting

When exploring allocation concealment, implementation and reporting questionnaires were found to elicit a low response rate amongst authors of RCTs, and the main recommendations to improve reporting quality are journals need to endorse, adhere and promote reporting guidelines.

In the name of science: Ethical violations in the ECHO randomised trial.

The ECHO trial has violated one of the central tenets of the Helsinki Declaration by privileging pursuit of knowledge over the interests of the girl/women trial participants from Africa.

Methodological Reporting Quality of Randomized Controlled Trials in 3 Leading Diabetes Journals From 2011 to 2013 Following CONSORT Statement

This study shows that methodological reporting quality of RCTs in the major diabetes journals remains suboptimal and can be further improved to meet and keep up with the standards of the CONSORT statement.

Glossary for randomized clinical trials.

The aim of the current paper is to present a comprehensive glossary of the terminology used in randomized clinical trials in order to assist authors when designing, executing and writing-up randomizedclinical trials.

Mechanisms and direction of allocation bias in randomised clinical trials

Inadequate allocation concealment may exaggerate treatment effects in some trials while underestimate effects in others, and the hypothesis provides a theoretical overview of the main factors responsible for the direction of allocation bias.

Randomization, Allocation Concealment, and Blinding

This chapter provides definitions and describes the various methods of randomization, allocation concealment, and blinding that can be adopted in N-of-1 trials and details the roles of specific research staff and the information required for the reporting of N- of-1 trial blinding methods in medical journals.
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