Allergy to Crickets: A Review

@article{Pener2016AllergyTC,
  title={Allergy to Crickets: A Review},
  author={Meir Paul Pener},
  journal={Journal of Orthoptera Research},
  year={2016},
  volume={25},
  pages={91 - 95}
}
  • M. Pener
  • Published 21 December 2016
  • Art
  • Journal of Orthoptera Research
Abstract Cricket allergy is less severe and less common than allergy to locusts and grasshoppers. A partial cross-reactivity exists between cricket and grasshopper allergens. Cricket allergens are proteinaceous compounds, but their nature is insufficiently known; arginine kinase and hexamerin 1B may play a role. Occupational allergy, i.e. allergy of personnel working with rearing and breeding of cricket colonies, is the subject of the majority of reports on cricket allergy. Frequent handling of… 
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