Allergic risks of consuming edible insects: A systematic review

@article{Ribeiro2018AllergicRO,
  title={Allergic risks of consuming edible insects: A systematic review},
  author={J. Ribeiro and L. Cunha and B. Sousa-Pinto and Jo{\~a}o Fonseca},
  journal={Molecular Nutrition \& Food Research},
  year={2018},
  volume={62},
  pages={\&NA;}
}
The expected future demand for food and animal-derived protein will require environment-friendly novel food sources with high nutritional value. Insects may be one of such novel food sources. However, there needs to be an assessment of the risks associated with their consumption, including allergic risks. Therefore, we performed a systematic review aiming to analyse current data available regarding the allergic risks of consuming insects. We reviewed all reported cases of food allergy to… Expand
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