Allergic contact dermatitis to ethoxyquin in a farmer handling chicken feeds

@article{Rubel1998AllergicCD,
  title={Allergic contact dermatitis to ethoxyquin in a farmer handling chicken feeds},
  author={Diana M Rubel and Susanne Freeman},
  journal={Australasian Journal of Dermatology},
  year={1998},
  volume={39}
}
Farm workers handling animal feeds are exposed to a variety of chemicals, some of which may cause allergic contact dermatitis. A case of allergy to ethoxyquin (a preservative added to chicken feed to inhibit vitamin degradation) in a chicken farmer is presented. Although the offending allergen was identified in this patient, it proved difficult to find ethoxyquin free chicken feed products and the patient's dermatitis persisted. When facing the clinical problem of dermatitis in animal workers… 

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Three cases of contact dermatitis due to additives in animal feed substances are described occurring in animal feed workers. There were two cases of sensitivity to ethoxyquin and one to halquinol.

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