All in the ears: unlocking the early life history biology and spatial ecology of fishes

@article{Starrs2016AllIT,
  title={All in the ears: unlocking the early life history biology and spatial ecology of fishes},
  author={Danswell Starrs and Brendan C. Ebner and Christopher J. Fulton},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2016},
  volume={91}
}
Obtaining biological and spatial information of the early life history (ELH) phases of fishes has been problematic, such that larval and juvenile phases are often referred to as the ‘black box’ of fish population biology and ecology. However, a potent source of life‐history data has been mined from the earstones (otoliths) of bony fishes. We systematically reviewed 476 empirical papers published between 2005 and 2012 (inclusive) that used otoliths to examine fish ELH phases, which has been an… Expand
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