Alien Non-Marine Snails and Slugs of Priority Quarantine Importance in the United States: A Preliminary Risk Assessment

@inproceedings{Cowie2009AlienNS,
  title={Alien Non-Marine Snails and Slugs of Priority Quarantine Importance in the United States: A Preliminary Risk Assessment},
  author={Robert H. Cowie and Robert T. Dillon and David G. Robinson and James Wilson Smith},
  year={2009}
}
Abstract: In 2002, the U.S. Department of Agriculture requested assistance from the American Malacological Society in the development of a list of non-native snails and slugs of top national quarantine significance. From a review of the major pest snail and slug literature, together with our own experience, we developed a preliminary list of gastropod species displaying significant potential to damage natural ecosystems or agriculture, or human health or commerce, and either entirely absent… 
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