Alcohol marketing: grooming the next generation

@article{Hastings2013AlcoholMG,
  title={Alcohol marketing: grooming the next generation},
  author={Gerard Hastings and Nick Sheron},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2013},
  volume={346}
}
Children are more exposed than adults and need much stronger protection 

Alcohol—who is paying the price?

  • I. Gilmore
  • Economics
    BMJ : British Medical Journal
  • 2015
Britain can’t afford to foot the £21bn bill that alcohol delivers annually to the economy, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

Effect of policy, economics, and the changing alcohol marketplace on alcohol related deaths in England and Wales

The economic downturn and rises in alcohol taxation seem to have stemmed the persistent rise in alcohol related deaths in England and Wales, but Nick Sheron and Ian Gilmore caution that changes to

Young People, Alcohol Packaging and Digital Media

Two aspects of contemporary alcohol marketing merit particular concern: packaging, and how this relates to online marketing, and two qualitative methods were used.

Alcohol: taking a population perspective

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Young adults, alcohol and Facebook: a synergistic relationship

This study addresses a key gap in the literature that is needed to inform social marketing interventions to reduce excessive alcohol consumption: when, why and how do young people post about alcohol.

Alcohol marketing and drunkenness among students in the Philippines: findings from the nationally representative Global School-based Student Health Survey

There are significant associations between alcohol marketing exposure and increased alcohol use and drunkenness among youth in the Philippines and the need to put policies into effect that restrict alcohol marketing practices as an important prevention strategy for reducing alcohol Use and its dire consequences among vulnerable youth is highlighted.

Differential segmentation responses to an alcohol social marketing program.

Marketing to Youth in the Digital Age: The Promotion of Unhealthy Products and Health Promoting Behaviours on Social Media

The near-ubiquitous use of social media among adolescents and young adults creates opportunities for both corporate brands and health promotion agencies to target and engage with young audiences in

Association Between Young Australian's Drinking Behaviours and Their Interactions With Alcohol Brands on Facebook: Results of an Online Survey.

The findings of this study demonstrate the need for further research into the complex interaction between social networking and alcohol consumption, and add support to calls for effective regulation of alcohol marketing on social network platforms.

References

SHOWING 1-5 OF 5 REFERENCES

Failure of self regulation of UK alcohol advertising

Although the content of alcohol advertisements is restricted, Gerard Hastings and colleagues find that advertisers are still managing to appeal to young people and promote drinking

Assessment of young people’s exposure to alcohol marketing in audiovisual and online media.

An assessment of young people’s exposure to alcohol marketing through television and online media in Europe and the use of age gates to restrict content to those over the legal drinking age is carried out.

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