Alcohol exposure and paracetamol‐induced hepatotoxicity

@article{Riordan2002AlcoholEA,
  title={Alcohol exposure and paracetamol‐induced hepatotoxicity},
  author={Stephen M. Riordan and Roger Williams},
  journal={Addiction Biology},
  year={2002},
  volume={7}
}
Abstract Most instances of hepatotoxicity due to paracetamol in the United Kingdom and Australia are the result of large overdoses of the drug taken with suicidal or parasuicidal intent. In contrast, serious hepatotoxicity at recommended or near‐recommended doses for therapeutic purposes has been reported, mainly from the United States and in association with chronic alcohol use, leading to the widely held belief that chronic alcoholics are predisposed to paracetamol‐related toxicity at… Expand
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