Alarm fatigue: a patient safety concern.

@article{Sendelbach2013AlarmFA,
  title={Alarm fatigue: a patient safety concern.},
  author={Sue E Sendelbach and Marjorie Funk},
  journal={AACN advanced critical care},
  year={2013},
  volume={24 4},
  pages={
          378-86; quiz 387-8
        }
}
Research has demonstrated that 72% to 99% of clinical alarms are false. The high number of false alarms has led to alarm fatigue. Alarm fatigue is sensory overload when clinicians are exposed to an excessive number of alarms, which can result in desensitization to alarms and missed alarms. Patient deaths have been attributed to alarm fatigue. Patient safety and regulatory agencies have focused on the issue of alarm fatigue, and it is a 2014 Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal. Quality… Expand
Alarm Fatigue 13-1 13 . Alarm Fatigue
Introduction Alarm fatigue occurs when clinicians experience high exposure to medical device alarms, causing alarm desensitization and leading to missed alarms or delayed response. As the frequencyExpand
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