Akdamut: History, Folklore, and Meaning

@article{Hoffman2009AkdamutHF,
  title={Akdamut: History, Folklore, and Meaning},
  author={Jeffrey E. Hoffman},
  journal={Jewish Quarterly Review},
  year={2009},
  volume={99},
  pages={161 - 183}
}
Akdamut, an introductory hymn to the Aramaic translation of the Torah reading in the Ashkenazic rite for the first day of Shavuot, has outlived all other such hymns, and, it has outlived – by many centuries – the custom of chanting the Aramaic translation itself on Shavuot – its erstwhile raison d’etre! Why should such a lengthy (90 lines) literary creation in a language not understood by most Jews, introducing a translation of the Torah reading not used by these Jews for a thousand years… Expand
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References

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This line of the poem ingeniously weaves both interpretations of 'al mut into one line: ''robustly'' and ''eternally.'' 69. That is, our bliss in paradise. 70. The scene is found in Leviticus Rabbah
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