Airway Management in Patients With Facial Trauma

@article{Mohan2009AirwayMI,
  title={Airway Management in Patients With Facial Trauma},
  author={R. Mohan and Rajiv Iyer and S. Thaller},
  journal={Journal of Craniofacial Surgery},
  year={2009},
  volume={20},
  pages={21-23}
}
Management of the airway is a major concern in patients with maxillofacial trauma (gunshot wounds, facial fractures, cervical spine injuries, laryngotracheal injuries) because a compromised airway can lead to death. The method of intubation to use in these patients remains a controversial topic. Although there are many options available, each one has specific indications, and the choice will ultimately depend on the patient's situation and the expertise of the trauma team. In general… Expand
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