Airway Glucose Homeostasis: A New Target in the Prevention and Treatment of Pulmonary Infection

@article{Baker2018AirwayGH,
  title={Airway Glucose Homeostasis: A New Target in the Prevention and Treatment of Pulmonary Infection},
  author={Emma H. Baker and Deborah L. Baines},
  journal={Chest},
  year={2018},
  volume={153},
  pages={507–514}
}
&NA; In health, the glucose concentration of airway surface liquid (ASL) is 0.4 mM, about 12 times lower than the blood glucose concentration. Airway glucose homeostasis comprises a set of processes that actively maintain low ASL glucose concentration against the transepithelial gradient. Tight junctions between airway epithelial cells restrict paracellular glucose movement. Epithelial cellular glucose transport and metabolism removes glucose from ASL. Low ASL glucose concentrations make an… Expand
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