Air pollution and early deaths in the United States. Part I: Quantifying the impact of major sectors in 2005

@article{Caiazzo2013AirPA,
  title={Air pollution and early deaths in the United States. Part I: Quantifying the impact of major sectors in 2005},
  author={Fabio Cova Caiazzo and Akshay Ashok and Ian A. Waitz and Steve Hung‐Lam Yim and Steven R. H. Barrett},
  journal={Atmospheric Environment},
  year={2013},
  volume={79},
  pages={198-208}
}
Combustion emissions adversely impact air quality and human health. A multiscale air quality model is applied to assess the health impacts of major emissions sectors in United States. Emissions are classified according to six different sources: electric power generation, industry, commercial and residential sources, road transportation, marine transportation and rail transportation. Epidemiological evidence is used to relate long-term population exposure to sector-induced changes in the… Expand

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