Agriculture in the Central Asian Bronze Age

@article{Spengler2015AgricultureIT,
  title={Agriculture in the Central Asian Bronze Age},
  author={Robert Nicholas Spengler},
  journal={Journal of World Prehistory},
  year={2015},
  volume={28},
  pages={215-253}
}
  • R. Spengler
  • Published 4 September 2015
  • Economics
  • Journal of World Prehistory
By the late third/early second millennium BC, increased interconnectivity in the mountains of Central Asia linked populations across Eurasia. This increasing interaction would later culminate in the Silk Road. While these populations are typically lumped together under the title of ‘nomads’, a growing corpus of data illustrates how diverse their economic strategies were, in many cases representing mixed agropastoral systems. These Central Asian low-investment agropastoralists are responsible… 

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