Agricultural Diseases on the Move Early in the Third Millennium

@article{Arzt2010AgriculturalDO,
  title={Agricultural Diseases on the Move Early in the Third Millennium},
  author={Jonathan Arzt and William Rodney White and Bruce V. Thomsen and C. C. Brown},
  journal={Veterinary Pathology},
  year={2010},
  volume={47},
  pages={15 - 27}
}
With few exceptions, the diseases that present the greatest risk to food animal production have been largely similar throughout the modern era of veterinary medicine. The current trend regarding the ever-increasing globalization of the trade of animals and animal products ensures that agricultural diseases will continue to follow legal and illegal trade patterns with increasing rapidity. Global climate changes have already had profound effects on the distribution of animal diseases, and it is… 
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