Aging and the misinformation effect: a neuropsychological analysis.

@article{Roediger2007AgingAT,
  title={Aging and the misinformation effect: a neuropsychological analysis.},
  author={Henry L. Roediger and Lisa Geraci},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition},
  year={2007},
  volume={33 2},
  pages={
          321-34
        }
}
  • H. Roediger, L. Geraci
  • Published 1 March 2007
  • Psychology
  • Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
Older adults' susceptibility to misinformation in an eyewitness memory paradigm was examined in two experiments. Experiment 1 showed that older adults are more susceptible to interfering misinformation than are younger adults on two different tests (old-new recognition and source monitoring). Experiment 2 examined the extent to which processes associated with frontal lobe functioning underlie older adults' source-monitoring difficulties. Older adults with lower frontal-lobe-functioning scores… 

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