Aging and motivated cognition: the positivity effect in attention and memory

@article{Mather2005AgingAM,
  title={Aging and motivated cognition: the positivity effect in attention and memory},
  author={Mara Mather and Laura L. Carstensen},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2005},
  volume={9},
  pages={496-502}
}

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TLDR
It is revealed that older adults recruit cognitive control processes to strengthen positive and diminish negative information in memory, and younger adults showed no signs of using cognitive control to make their memories more positive, indicating that, for them, emotion regulation goals are not chronically activated.
The Role of Motivation in the Age-Related Positivity Effect in Autobiographical Memory
This study reveals that older adults have a positivity effect in long-term autobiographical memory and that a positivity bias can be induced in younger adults by a heightened motivation to regulate
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